Ingenuity 2018: Get Involved!

IngenuityFest is always up to something, that’s what keeps us at the top of our innovation game!

All applications are now open for IngenuityFest 2018: FuturePast . . . Curious what we get up to? Check out some of our cool photos displaying what we were able to create together last year!

 

 

If those photos just got your creative juices a-flowin’,  check out the official IngenuityFest 2018 Theme + Design Competition, and help create the look and feel of the Fest!

Gallery of Adeel in Studio

Frank Lanza documents Adeel uz Zafar working  in his studio during his three month residency as part of the Cleveland Foundations Creative Fusion program.   Ingenuity is hosting Adeel until the end of May 2014.

See Rain Fall by Akimitsu Sadoi LED Artist

Akimitsu Sadoi LED ArtistWhen asked, Akimitsu Sadoi defined the concept of “ingenuity” as “the basis or answer or solution to the creativity. You need to be able to come up with the solution, it’s the word that describes times that can come up with the solution.” Sadoi is just one of close to forty artists exhibiting work at the 2013 IngenuityFest.

A Hiroshima native, Sadoi has been living in Brooklyn, NY for the past 23 years. As a child he became obsessed with electronics, and in particular lights. An LED light caught his attention on a radio as a power indicator light as a young student in elementary school. Since LEDs were expensive at the time, he would buy a few at local stores and begin to experiment with them. However, in recent years as LEDs have be come more affordable, he has started to do a lot more experimentation with programming LEDs.

Consistent with the 2013 theme of “clouds,” Sadoi’s piece, Rain Fall, is a large array of approximately 50 straight lined LED bars. Each bar consists of 50 or more LEDs programmed to create a rapid, smooth, downward motion of light, much like rain drops. The motion of light also represents movement of information, from one person to another, or through networks. The entire array is controlled to display something meaningful, while sometimes showing seemingly random patterns. This reminds the viewer of the natural world, where seemingly random and chaotic scenes are generated from organized sets of rules.

Although this is Sadoi’s first time collaborating with Ingenuity, the atypical venue is a challenge he welcomes. He believes, “It’s good to start with some place completely raw. You get to really mold the whole environment. Not just your piece.”

Read about one of Aki’s project in Make: Link

Creative Fusion Artist Yun Sabi Opening Performance

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Ingenuity has been proud to host visiting artist Yun Sabi as part of the Cleveland Foundation’s Creative Fusion Program.

Sabi’s opening and one night only performance of Abandoned Room is tonight at the downtown branch of the Cleveland Public Library. It’s free and open to the public. Please RSVP dana@ingenuitycleveland.org. It’s starts at 6PM with a performance at 6:45PM.

You can download a program for the event here.

From Carolyn Jack’s awesome program notes:

In Abandoned Room, Sabi surrounds you with information about a problem that Clevelanders and Koreans share: the homeless and how to cope with their needs. Sabi’s interest in this issue is more than academic, because he grew up with it: His father, left homeless in childhood as a result of the Korean War, and committed to helping others in need, founded an unofficial homeless enclave called the Ragpicker’s Community in Gangnam (yes, that Gangnam, Psyfans), one of Seoul’s richest districts, back in 1986. He and the other members of this community set up an illegal camp on private property, later expanding to a second location on public property under a bridge, where they built illegal shelters and supported themselves by collecting and selling scrap and recyclable materials for 25 years.

Photos for Cleveland Mini Maker Faire 2013

On Saturday, April 13, 2013, Ingenuity produced a the first annual Cleveland Mini Maker Faire in partnership with the Cleveland Public Library.  Photo credit: Frank Lanza